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24/11/2017 5:11pm
RT @BristolRobotLab: APPLY NOW: Opportunity to join the FARSCOPE 4 year PhD programme in 2018, based here at the BRL [LINK]
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20/11/2017 12:10pm
How is information utilised in robot swarms? "The Information-Cost-Reward framework for understanding #robot #swarm[LINK]
15/11/2017 10:12pm
DVLA asks me to join the NHS Organ Donor Register after I ordered a form to get my driving license. They already kn… [LINK]

[Welcome]

Lenka Pitonakova Welcome to my web site!

I am a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Southampton and I currently work at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory. My research area is swarm robotics, in particular understanding information flow in robot swarms in order to arrive at formal design principles for multi-robot algorithms. My wider research interests include robotics and smart systems in general, especially those used in homes and in urban areas. I post about research on Twitter, LinkedIn and in my blog.

Apart from doing research, I am also a software developer with extensive experience in different languages, platforms and toolkits. My passion is computer games developent and I am always working on a personal side project when the time allows. Apart from programming, I enjoy creative writing, drawing and playing music.

I have a PhD in Simulation of Complex Systems, a Masters in Evolutionary and Adaptive Systems and a BSc in Games Development.

Current research projects

Designing robot swarms

Current fun project: The Hive Mind: Collective building with robots

The Hive Mind

 

[What I've been recently up to]

The Information-Cost-Reward framework for understanding robot swarm foraging
The Information-Cost-Reward (ICR) framework relates the way in which robots obtain and share information about where work needs to be done to the swarm’s ability to exploit that information in order to perform work efficiently in the context of a particular task and environment.
Behaviour-Data Relations Modelling Language For Multi-Robot Control Algorithms
Behaviour-Data Relations Modeling Language (BDRML) explicitely represents behaviours and data that robots utilise, as well as relationships between them. This allows BDRML to express control algorithms where robots cooperate and share information with each other while interacting with the environment.
Robot swarms in action
Watch e-puck robots collect resources and bring them back to base. While the previous simulation work helped us to learn a lot about the advantages and disadvantages of communication in swarms, doing similar experiments with real robots is already revealing interesting new things.
How to compile code for e-puck robots on your computer
Compiling code natively on e-puck robots or cross-compiling on your computer can be very tedious. Luckily, there is a third option: compiling code on a virtualised robot system on your computer, then sending the program onto the robot.
Coding for tomorrow: Why is good code important?
"Why should I care about how my code is written, as long as it works?" I will argue here that well-structured and well-written code not only saves time on a project, it also helps you to invest your time in a way that is meaningful for your future work.