[related]

[Tweets]

17/01/2018 12:50pm
A detailed look at the features and performance of #robotic #simulators, #V-REP, #Gazebo and #ARGoS. Which one do y… [LINK]
12/01/2018 1:19pm
A great summary of robotics and AI ethics by @alan_winfield on @Robohub I find the first EPSRC Principle rather hyp… [LINK]
11/01/2018 1:16pm
RT @alan_winfield: Our new @FrontRoboticsAI paper: Simulation-based Internal Models for Safer Robots [LINK]

[Publications]

Journal papers

Pitonakova, L., Crowder, R. & Bullock, S. (2017). The Information-Cost-Reward framework for understanding robot swarm foraging. Swarm Intelligence, DOI: 10.1007/s11721-017-0148-3.
[about the project]

Pitonakova, L., Crowder, R. & Bullock, S. (2016). Information flow principles for plasticity in foraging robot swarms. Swarm Intelligence, 10(1), 33–63.
[about the project]

Wilson, R., zu Erbach-Schoenberg, E., Albert, M., Power, D., Tudge, S., Gonzalez, M., Guthrie, S., Chamberlain, H., Brooks, C., Hughes, C., Pitonakova, L., Buckee, C., Lu, X., Wetter, E., Tatem, A. & Bengtsson, L. (2016). Rapid and near real-time assessments of population displacement using mobile phone data following disasters: The 2015 Nepal earthquake. PLOS Currents Disasters, DOI: 10.1371/currents.dis.d073fbece328e4c39087bc086d694b5c.

Pitonakova, L. (2013). Ultrastable neuroendocrine robot controller. Adaptive Behaviour, 21(1), 47-63.
[about the project]

Conference publications (peer reviewed)

Pitonakova, L., Crowder R. & Bullock, S. (2017). Behaviour-Data Relations Modelling Language for multi-robot control algorithms. Proceedings of the 2017 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2017), IEEE, 727-732.
[about the project]

Pitonakova, L., Crowder R. & Bullock, S. (2016). Task allocation in foraging robot swarms: The Role of Information Sharing. In Gershenson, C. et al. (eds.), Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (ALIFE XV), MIT Press, 306-313.
[about the project]

Pitonakova, L., Crowder R. & Bullock, S. (2015). Design Patterns for Swarms of Robot Foragers. Abstract & poster at The International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2015), Hamburg, Germany.
[download the poster]

Pitonakova, L., Crowder R. & Bullock, S. (2014). Understanding the role of recruitment in collective robot foraging. In Lipson, H. et al. (eds.), Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (ALIFE 14), MIT Press, 264-271.
[about the project]

Pitonakova, L. & Bullock, S. (2013). Controlling ant-based construction. In Lio, P. et al. (eds.), Proceedings of the Twelfth European Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (ECAL 2013), MIT Press, 151-158.
[about the project]

Book chapters

Pitonakova, L. (2014). Afterword: Rise of the Machines. In: Amos, M. & Page, R. (eds.) Beta Life - Stories from an A-life Future. Comma Press, pp. 37-40.

Selected talks

2017: Behaviour-Data Relations Modelling Language For Multi-Robot Control Algorithms: The International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2017), Vancouver, Canada

2017: Designing Robot Swarms: a talk at the Southwest Futurists, Bristol.

2016: What is Life?: a talk at the Sceptics Cafe, Brighton.

2016: Task Allocation in Foraging Robot Swarms: The Role of Information Sharing: The Fifteenth International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (ALIFE XV)

2015: Object Oriented Software Development (In Python): a talk for members of the Flowminder Foundation and of The World Food Programme.

2015: The Hive Mind game: University of Sussex, 2015

2015: Towards Design Patterns for Robot Swarms: invited talk at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory, Bristol, United Kingdom

2014: Software Project Planning & Management: workshop at 2014 Student Conference in Complexity Science (SCCS 2014)

2014: Understanding the Role of Recruitment in Collective Robot Foraging: The Fourteenth International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (ALIFE 14)

2013: Controlling Ant-Based Construction: Twelfth European Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (ECAL 2013)

2013: Information Exchange and Coordination in Robot Swarms: annual Agents, Interaction and Complexity meeting, University of Southampton

Selected posters

2015: Design Patterns for Swarms of Robot Foragers: The International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2015), Hamburg, Germany

2015: Self-Organised Regulation of Foraging Traffic in Robotic Swarms: annual Complex Systems DTC meeting, University of Southampton

2014: Understanding the Role of Recruitment in Collective Robot Foraging: annual Complex Systems DTC meeting, University of Southampton

 

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