[Swarm Systems]

I believe the future will benefit from distributed physical systems where small and simple parts cooperate to deliver highly flexible and emergent global behaviour. Imagine groups of small robots that will tidy up and guard your home, can be sent to a deep-ocean or space exploration missions or form a homeostatic body similarly to how biological cells do.

While it branches off the bio-inspired machines field, swarm robotics has become a standalone research topic pursued by the Swarmanoid, Swarm-bot, SMAVNET and other projects. Although a lot of a advancement in understanding biological and mechanical swarm systems has been made, I think that we should concentrate more on mechanics of data and information exchange between the swarm units in order to improve adaptivity and autonomy of current artificial systems. This is therefore a topic I will pursue during my PhD in Simulation of Complex Systems at the University of Southampton.

Projects

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Robot swarms in action
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