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[Mayan Madness]

Date: Jan 2009
Tags: games :: C++

Mayan Madness is a 3D third-person adventure game that I participated on as a lead developer in the last year of my undergraduate course.

Download Mayan Madness Windows-compatible installation file
Inside of the first tombThe main goal of the game is to get out of a network of buried Mayan tombs by solving puzzles and collecting hidden keys. There are stone guardians that attack the player by shooting arrows or trying to crush him. The enemies can be fought in a melee combat with a sabre or by throwing the sabre from a distance.

Development

Above the groundThe game was coded in C++ and used Ogre 3D as a rendering and scene management engine. Cel-shading was added to give the game a cartoony effect. The development team consisted of two programmers, a HUD developer, a sound artist and a graphics artist.

The whole creation process was agile
and my role as a lead developer was to bring the team's ideas together, come up with executable development plans and distribute technical tasks. Apart from helping with other programming bits and pieces, I created the basic object class structure, implemented NPC behaviour, collision detection and interaction with the player, as well as developed a mini jigsaw puzzle game in Flash that was later incorporated into Ogre.
Encounter with a stone guardian


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